How To Clean Hammerite Off Brushes

For most homeowners, painting is a chore that they have to do periodically in order to keep their homes looking new. However, many people are unsure of how to clean off the paint after they’re finished with it. 

How To Clean Hammerite Off Brushes

Many people use Hammerite Coating on their brushes when they’re painting with it because it will help protect against rusting and corrosion. This article will show you How To Clean Hammerite Off Brushes so that you can use them again.

Hammerite has a reputation for being really hard to clean off your brush after your done painting. But is this reputation justified anymore, or is it leftover from a different era when Hammerite had a much different formulation?

In addition, Hammerite is a two-part epoxy, which can be mixed in two separate bottles.

Is the current formulation any easier to clean off a brush? And do you have to use more water to clean it off?

Answer: The current formulation is no easier to clean off a brush.

Hammerite is formulated to dry fast, making it easy to remove with a brush. But you have to apply more water and work harder than if you had used traditional oil paint. Because you have to use a lot of water, the amount of time you can spend working in one area is limited. If you want to work for a long time without cleaning, you should use traditional oil paint.

In addition to the original Hammerite, other brands include:

Hammerite – the current formulation of Hammerite

Fiberlok – an early formulation of Hammerite

Astroflux – a previous formulation of Hammerite.

As you can see, there have been multiple formulations over the years, and the current formulation is much different than the one used during the 1940s.

The current formulation contains urea-formaldehyde and resin, formalin, and ammonium nitrate. It is also much thicker than previous formulations and is marketed as a “super” high gloss finish. Here are some of the key differences between the current Hammerite formulation and previous formulations.

Note: Some people say you should not use water at all when cleaning off a finished painting with epoxy. This is not true. You should use warm water and a scrub brush to clean your paint off. Don’t use any water that is colder than body temperature (98.6° F). 

Using cold water will cause your epoxy to harden before it has a chance to come off. Just give it a good scrubbing, and then rinse well with warm water, resin and formalin. The older formulations contained ammonium nitrate.

Conversely, the newer formulations do not contain any ammonium nitrate. The current formulation has much more water than the older formulations. Hammerite – the current formulation of Hammerite Hammerite is a two-part epoxy, which can be mixed in two separate bottles. Is the current formulation any easier to clean off a brush? And do you have to use more water to clean it off? 

Since the company started manufacturing Hammerite in 1981, there have been several different formulations of Hammerite. Is the current formulation any easier to clean off a brush? And do you have to use more water to clean it off? 

Do the current formulations last longer than past formulations? If so, how do they compare? A little bit of background on Hammerite: Hammerite was invented in 1938 by the late Henry E. Hammer in Germany. It was first introduced to the US in 1941. The formulation is made up of three chemicals: urea-formaldehyde resin, formalin, and ammonium nitrate.

In addition to Hammerite’s basic chemical makeup, there have been several different types of Hammerite: Low-Viscosity Hammerite (1981 – present), Low Viscosity Hammerite with Tungsten Carbide (1992 – 1996., Low Viscosity Hammerite with Aluminum Oxide (1997 – present), and Low Viscosity Hammerite with Silica (2010 – present). 

Hammerite with Aluminum Oxide and Low Viscosity Hammerite with Tungsten Carbide has not been around since 1997 and 1996 respectively. Hammerite has a reputation for being really hard to clean off your brush after your done painting. But is this reputation justified anymore, or is it leftover from a different era when Hammerite had a much different formulation?

Finally, is the current formulation any easier to clean off a brush? And do you have to use more water to clean it off? 

In addition to the original Hammerite, other brands include Low Viscosity Hammerite with Tungsten Carbide Low Viscosity Hammerite with Aluminum Oxide Low Viscosity Hammerite with Silica Since the company started manufacturing Hammerite in 1981, there have been several different formulations of Hammerite. 

In conclusion, using the right tools is key to removing Hammerite from brushes.

A number of tools can be used for removing hammerite off of brushes. However, they will not work as well without the right products. The best option is to use steel wool after cleaning it with paint thinner, followed by oil soap and warm water.

 

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